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Mailbag: Letters from readers


February 27. 2013 12:42AM
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I would like you to know how I got ignored by the Citizens Voice. I wrote them a letter how Verizon over charged me for a service that they did not do. I told them that I had static in my line; he asked me if I had insurance and I said no. he said if they only check the outside line it cost nothing. They never came in my home. He came and checked the outside line and left I wasn’t eve home. I found the trouble with an extra phone. When I disconnected, the static was gone.

I called Verizon ad the man told me he was there and left and fund nothing wrong. I told him I found the trouble. Verizon charged me $150. they got me for $100 but I put a stop on auto-pay because I was being cheated and over charged.

I wrote Verizon, they never answered. I called a couple of times, no answer. I get both newspapers, but I will be getting rid of the Voice.

Joseph Rominski

Wilkes-Barre

Open letter to GeisingerHealth System

It is with great dismay that I feel the need to inform you of my resentment and shock when I received your 16-page questionnaire about the “Quality of Dying and Death”.

Your lack of sensitivity is already evident with your first word, “thequalityof dying and death”. There is no such thing as the quality of death—only of life. The English language has more appropriate terms available to express what you wish to say.

While the accompanying letter insists that the survey’s goal is “to improve the care patients and their families receive…” very few of the questions relate — at least not directly — to “care”, but rather to the most intimate details of the dying processand ultimately of death itself.

As the bereaved, it was emotionally wrenching for me to read the questions and their follow-up of “how would you rate this aspect of your love one’s dying experience? Circle one number: terrible = 0, almost perfect = 10.” It took my breath away how you could confront a grieving family member with the customary format used for a commercial survey.

Your insensitivity is accentuated with the inclusion of a $1 bill. Do you really believe that the incentive of a $1 payment would induce anyone to answer these heart-wrenching questions, some of which are of such content that the bereaved would not even want to think about them let alone evaluate them on a scale of 1-10?

Your survey forces the bereaved to relive every devastating moment during what must surely be the most difficultexperienceineveryone’s life: the death of a loved one. Therefore, I urge you toreview ethics, sensitivity and respect as they relate to the deceased and the bereaved and re-evaluate if the questions in their present phrasing serve any purpose except to exert emotional pain on those who are expected to answer them.

I am returning your survey unanswered along with your $1 bill.

Anneliese Moghul

Fairview Township

I will make this letter short and to the point.This is in response to a letter by Wilber Tillman

I am really getting tired of radical thinking Vegans and Vegetarians blaming me and others who

include meat in their diet for all the ills on this earth.We are so rotten because we eat the poor

animals that are raised for food. We are also to blame for global warming.If this were even true

we are not criminals and I for one are tired of their attacks.Don’t eat meat ,but please stop

preaching to me and others who choose to eat meat.Mr Wilber Tillman has sunk to a new

low by more or less calling me and others poor Christians if we eat meat..I don’t need you

telling me how to follow Christ .I guess only vegans are going to heaven.Also as to health

problems with meat in ones diet,Mr Tillman,I don’t know your age, but I am 74 and in good

health..It must be from all the cheesesteaks I have eaten and I am not the one who is full

of balony .

Louis DeSpirito

Wilkes Barre

The Pennsylvania Wine and Spirits stores generate more than $500 million a year in taxes and profits that benefits all Pennsylvania’s residents. Corbett’s plan would bring in revenue one time only. Then the asset would be gone— forever. His friends who stand to profit would make out great,while Pa. taxpayers are left holding the bag.

In April 2012 the U.S Centers for Disease Control(CDC) recommended against any furthur privatization of alcohol sales. PA has the nation’slowestrate alcohol related deaths in the country, according to CDC.

United Food and Commercial Workers in Pa’s Wine and Spirit Shoppes conduct more than one million ID checks every year. Employees are trained to spot phony ID’s. Their record of doing so is unmatched anywhere in the US.

Five thousand men and women work in or support today’s Wine and Spirits Shoppes. They have family-sustaining jobs with decent benefits. Our economy is recovering. Why would we put 5,000 people out of work? Privatization would destroy current jobs and turn the work over to low-wage, no benefit jobs that do nothing to grow our states economy.

Wayne Namey

Wilkes Barre

NOT Confirmed

Typed by cls 2-18-13

In rebuttal to several who disagree with our state legislatures possible plan to award electors in a presidential election on the basis of federal legislative district votes, I submit the following:

Their “beef” is with the U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section I, which says in part “Each state shall appoint in such manner as the legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the state may be entitled in the congress.

Every ten years when a new census is taken, Pennsylvania is required to redraw, both for the state and federal districts, to make sure a fairly equal number of voters are in each district. Gerrymandering, when it occurs, can be challenged in court, so it balances out on the scales of justice in district redrawing.

Democrats, when in power, have been guilty of gerrymandering in their favor. The complaints have given no direction on how to redraw districts more equitably, at each new census.

Proportionality is not a new thing under the sun, and is often used to protect the rights of the minority, which is what would be done if electoral votes would be cast by federal voting districts in Pennsylvania, so many for each district. By the way, this is currently done in Maine and Nebraska.

Were we to eliminate proportionality everywhere, we would eliminate minority rights! One reader said the minority would override the majority. This is factually untrue. In fact, the reverse is true. We are swamped by big city votes; we in rural areas have no voice. By this method of proportionality, equity would be reinstated. In the last presidential election, President Obama would have garnered 12 electoral votes and Governor Romney eight in Pennsylvania.

Proportionality is wanted by minority groups and gender groups in the workplace ad this is as it should be when qualified; I would hope that the complainants wouldn’t be against this. However, they do have recourse under Article V of the U.S. Constitution, which allows amendments.

Yours truly,

James Sinclair

Mountain Top

570-474-5480




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