Monday, July 21, 2014





A shattered town looks for healing


February 19. 2013 11:25PM
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NEWTOWN, Conn. — The grief will not end. Yet the healing must begin. So as the shock of Newtown's horrific school shooting starts to wear off, as the headlines fade and the therapists leave, residents are seeking a way forward through faith, community and a determination to seize their future.


At religious services Sunday, church leaders received standing ovations from parishioners they have been helping to cope with the shooting deaths of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The gunman also killed his mother and himself.


This has been the worst week of my life, said Monsignor Robert Weiss of the St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church, which lost eight children and two adults in the massacre. He thanked the community for giving him strength to get through the week filled with funerals.


Meanwhile, a former teacher, Carole MacInnes, said she remembers the gunman as a smart, sweet boy in her second-grade class at Sandy Hook.


To deal with the short-term trauma, the state sent dozens of mental health professionals to Newtown. Sessions were available every day, at a half-dozen locations. Relief also has been provided by therapy and service dogs, massage therapists, acupuncturists and art therapists, from around Connecticut and the nation.


Rick Kaplan was driving back to South Carolina on Sunday with his nine service dogs. His Canine Angels usually assist disabled veterans, but he spent several days in Newtown with parents and grandparents of the victims, the victims' classmates and other town residents.


The families held dogs, cried, laughed, hugged and thanked us to say that this was invaluable, Kaplan said.


about my son right now.


After the Sunday service at Newtown's Trinity Episcopal Church, the Rev. Kathleen Adams-Shepherd received hugs and kisses from a long line of parishioners. She choked up as she read the names of the victims and offered a prayer for all of them, including gunman Adam Lanza and his slain mother, Nancy.


Things will never be the same here. And that transformation itself — heartbreaking and permanent as it may be — is the key to long-term recovery, say some of those helping to lead the healing of this shattered town.




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