Sunday, July 13, 2014





Storms flip cars, wreck houses


February 20. 2013 4:21AM
Story Tools
PrintPrint | E-MailEMail | SaveSave | Hear Generate QR Code QR
Send to Kindle


ADAIRSVILLE, Ga. — A massive storm system raked the Southeast on Wednesday, generating tornadoes and dangerous winds that flipped cars on a major Georgia interstate, demolished homes and businesses and killed at least two people.


WSB-TV in Atlanta aired footage of an enormous funnel cloud bearing down on Adairsville where the storm ripped through the city's downtown. Winds flattened homes and wiped out parts of a large manufacturing plant in the city about 60 miles northwest of Atlanta. Pieces of insulation hung from trees and power poles, and a bank was missing a big chunk of its roof.


A 51-year-old man was killed when a tree crashed through the mobile home roof, and nine were hospitalized for minor injuries, emergency management officials said. Residents said no traces remained of some roadside produce stands — a common sight on rural Georgia's back roads. One other death was reported in Tennessee when an uprooted tree fell onto a storage shed where a man had taken shelter.


The storms tossed vehicles on Interstate 75 onto their roofs, closing the highway for a time.


In Adairsville, the debris in one yard showed just how dangerous the storm had been: a bathtub, table, rolls of toilet paper and lumber lay in the grass next to what appeared to be a roof. Sheets of metal dangled from a large tree like ornaments.


The sky was swirling, said Theresa Chitwood, who owns the Adairsville Travel Plaza. She said she went outside to move her car because she thought it was going to hail. Instead, the storm decimated a building behind the plaza. Wind gusts were powerful enough to flip several tractor-trailers onto their sides in the parking lot.


Danny Odum and Rocky Depauw, truckers from Marion, Ill., had stopped for breakfast when the suspected tornado hit.


The pair had been driving their trucks through storm warnings all night long. They went inside to eat and Depauw got a weather alert on his phone. About two minutes later they saw debris flying through the parking lot and ran for an inner room.


I've been stopping here for probably 40 years, Odum said. I just stopped and had breakfast this morning, and this happened.


After it passed, Odum said he went outside to find his truck that was hauling diapers on its side with his dog Simon, a Boston terrier, still inside. Simon was scared but otherwise fine.


Depauw's truck was parked next to Odum's and was damaged but still upright. He speculated his heavy haul of cat litter may have helped his truck handle the hit better than his friend's.


Not far down the road, at Owen's Bar-B-Que, Chrystal Bagley and her coworkers heard warnings about severe weather on the radio, but they didn't hear Adairsville included. Around 11:45 a.m., the doors started rattling, and chairs and knick-knacks began blowing around the room as the door flapped open.


We heard this big old whooshing noise like a train, and then we ran to the restroom, but we had to dodge objects, she said. It was real scary.




Comments
comments powered by Disqus Commenting Guidelines
Poll
Mortgage Minute


Search for New & Used Cars

Make 
Model
 
Used New All
 

Search Times Leader Classifieds to find just the home you want!

Search Times Leader Classifieds to find just what you need!

Search Pet Classifieds
Dogs Cats Other Animals



Social Media/RSS
Times Leader on Twitter
Times Leader on Youtube
Times Leader on Google+
The Times Leader on Tumblr
The Times Leader on Pinterest
Times Leader RSS Feeds