Thursday, July 10, 2014





More coincidence than conspiracy at fashion week


March 16. 2013 8:12PM
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(AP) During every season of designer previews at New York Fashion Week a few key, quirky items seem to pop up on different runways. They're not quite trends since one has to think they're partly for runway effect not retail orders, but they're part of the style zeitgeist nonetheless. So, how does the ball start rolling on items such as oversized fur mittens, harnesses or sleeveless coats?


It's safe to say designers don't take a meeting together to decide what direction to go in.


The honest answer is some of it is plain and simple coincidence, said Cindi Leive, editor in chief of Glamour magazine. These designers are creating hundreds of looks over the course of a season. It would be more unusual if there were no overlap.


Still, she said, there also are fashion cycles and sociological factors to consider as catwalk collections are prepared.


Take fur both real and fake. Leive said Sunday it has been on every runway so far on this fourth of eight days of fashion week.


After the recession, no one was touching fur, she said, but it has slowly made a comeback as people feel a little more comfortable about spending money. The interpretation this go-around has been impactful, with an emphasis on oversized unexpected fur touches such as hoods, handbags and boots, but they're not as expensive as a full-length coat.


It's important for fashion insiders to be aware of what's happening in other parts of culture, including politics and art, said Marie Claire executive editor Nina Garcia earlier in the week as she prepared to judge aspiring designers at Project Runway.


Successful designers soak it all in, she said.


Fashion week continues in New York through Thursday, when the influential Marc Jacobs closes out things. Runway previews then move on to London, Milan and Paris.


VICTORIA BECKHAM


The opening look at Victoria Beckham's show was a windowpane plaid coat. She also incorporated more sweaters and knits into her collection, with a nod to mod with some geometric, colorblocked shift dresses.


The most unexpected looks were the flashes of bright yellow, including a sleeveless trench; the techno shine she added to pleated skirts that the audience could only see as the models walked; and the long cape-style tuxedo coat.


One of the important evolutions for fall is the softer shoulder, which she used to tweak one of her popular zip-back, slim-fit dress silhouettes.


For shoes, she put models in lower kitten heels, made in collaboration with Manolo Blahnik, which was a bit of a surprise for a woman known for skyscraper stilettos.


I'm always designing what I want to wear, she said.


CHRISTIAN SIRIANO


The Project Runway alum used the Russian opera as the inspiration for his fall runway show, using a book of Russian opera houses as reference.


The girl wearing this collection, he said, was on her way to see the Russian opera.


I wanted it to be a story of what she wears during the day, what she'll wear for a cocktail dress, what she'll wear to the opera, he said.


His vintage-inspired day looks evoke many eras, from the 1940s to the 1960s, and were mostly separates of turtlenecks paired with loose leather trousers and faux fur vests in muted colors such as white, black and camel.


One ensemble included a pointed-toe flat in a penny loafer style, a surprise inclusion given fashion's love for the high heel. Siriano explained it as a way to ensure its wearability, and also because he wanted it to be a bit more demure, a bit simple.


Other shoes in the collection included bootie heels and heeled penny loafers with gold trim, echoing the filigree that anchored many of the evening dresses that closed the show.


JOSEPH ALTUZARRA


Joseph Altuzarra's urban, confident, fashion-forward customer wears graphic black-and-white leather layers it on, in fact and then there's the fox or mink fur on top. She's not shy about drawing attention in fur mittens, shiny grommet embellishment and strategically placed zippers. She wears her high-waisted trousers with a low-slung belt.


His fall-winter collection also includes optic white pants and a khaki cotton sleeveless trench worn with a khaki four-button tailored skirt.


The silhouette he offers his customers is strong and slim, sometimes with a little bump at the hip.


The design and construction emphasize the nip of the waist and exaggerate the hip, while shrunken proportions mixed with a bolder shoulder volume sharpen the classic silhouette, he says in describing the shape.


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AP Writer Amanda Kwan contributed to this story.


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Follow Samantha Critchell on Twitter at http://twitter.com/AP_Fashion


Associated Press


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