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Last updated: March 16. 2013 7:13PM - 172 Views
By LAURA MILLS, Associated Press



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CHELYABINSK, Russia — As a small army of people worked to replace acres of windows shattered by the enormous explosion from a meteor, many joked on Saturday about what had happened in this troubled pocket of Russia.


One of the most popular jests: Residents of the meteor were terrified to see Chelyabinsk approaching.


The effect of the fireball that streaked into the sky over this tough industrial city at about sunrise Friday was undeniably traumatic. Nearly 1,200 people were reported injured by the shock wave from the explosion, estimated to be as strong as 20 Hiroshima atomic bombs.


But it also brought a sense of cooperation in a troubled region.


Chelyabinsk, nicknamed Tankograd because it produced the famed Soviet T-34 tanks, can be as grim as its backbone heavy industries. Long winters where temperatures routinely hit 22 degrees below zero add to a general dour mien, as do worries about dangerous facilities in the surrounding region.


In 1957, a waste tank at the Mayak nuclear weapons plant in the Chelyabinsk region exploded, contaminating 9,200 square miles and prompting authorities to evacuate 10,000 nearby residents. It is now Russia's main nuclear waste disposal facility. A vast plant for disposing of chemical weapons lies 50 miles east of the city.


The city is a place where people always seem bitter with each other, said music teacher Ilya Shibanov. But the meteor was one of the rare times when people started to live together through one event.


People got to work repairing the more than 4,000 buildings in the city and region where windows were shattered, or to provide other services.


More than 24,000 people, including volunteers, have mobilized in the region to cover windows, gather warm clothes and food, and make other relief efforts, the regional governor's office said. Crews from glass companies in adjacent regions were being flown in.


Gov. Mikhail Yurevich on Saturday said that damage from the high-altitude explosion – believed to have been as powerful as 20 Hiroshima bombs – is estimated at $33 million. He promised to have all the broken windows replaced within a week.


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