Friday, July 11, 2014





French company demos driverless shuttle at CES


January 06. 2014 8:36PM
Associated Press

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(AP) French company Induct on Monday showed off the first driverless vehicle to be commercially available in the U.S.


The Navia shuttle isn't ready for U.S. street traffic yet, but this standing-room-only shuttle can transport up to 10 people from point to point on university campuses or in airport parking lots at speeds topping out at 12.5 miles per hour.


It even charges itself wirelessly.


At $250,000 per vehicle, it's not likely to make car aficionados' hearts skip a beat. But it advances the idea of the driverless car with turtle-like practicality.


The shuttle is already being tested on public streets on college campuses in Switzerland, Britain and Singapore, according to Induct founder Pierre Lefevre.


Lefevre said he expects to see some of the vehicles on public roads in the U.S. this year, but that could require the modification of existing laws.


The idea of the Navia is to provide "last-mile mobility" at airports, universities, theme parks, shopping malls, historical monuments and other densely packed places, Lefevre said.


"It's more complementary to public transportation systems than replacing them," he said. "This can remove private cars from campuses and the very center of cities."


Associated Press


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