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Last updated: November 11. 2013 4:37PM - 408 Views
Associated Press



A survivor walks beside a ship that was washed ashore hitting makeshift houses near an oil depot in Tacloban city, Leyte province central Philippines on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013. Authorities said at least 2 million people in 41 provinces had been affected by Friday's typhoon Haiyan and at least 23,000 houses had been damaged or destroyed. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
A survivor walks beside a ship that was washed ashore hitting makeshift houses near an oil depot in Tacloban city, Leyte province central Philippines on Monday, Nov. 11, 2013. Authorities said at least 2 million people in 41 provinces had been affected by Friday's typhoon Haiyan and at least 23,000 houses had been damaged or destroyed. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
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(AP) Scientists say nature and man together cooked up the disaster that has devastated parts of the Philippines.


Typhoon Haiyan (HY'-ahn) smacked the island nation with fierce winds and a deadly storm surge. The Philippines sit in the middle of the world's most storm-prone region, which gets some of the biggest typhoons because of vast expanses of warm water that act as fuel.


But meteorologists say humans played a big role in this disaster probably bigger than nature's.


Factors in the unfolding tragedy include poverty and a tremendous growth in population, much of it in vulnerable coastal areas with poor construction.


Associated Press
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