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Last updated: February 08. 2014 1:38PM - 568 Views
Associated Press



In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, an exhibit at the City/County building in downtown Pittsburgh is highlighting early artists who helped break the comic book color barrier by featuring black characters and a publisher who started to break the comic color barrier in the 1930s and 1940s. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
In this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 photo, an exhibit at the City/County building in downtown Pittsburgh is highlighting early artists who helped break the comic book color barrier by featuring black characters and a publisher who started to break the comic color barrier in the 1930s and 1940s. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
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(AP) An exhibit in Pittsburgh is highlighting early artists who helped break the comic book color barrier by featuring black characters.


The exhibit called "Beyond the Funny Pages" coincides with Black History Month and is being shown through the end of February at the City/County building. It chronicles the contributions of several prominent blacks in the industry in the 1930s and '40s, including the first black female comic artist and the first black comic publisher.


Orrin Evans published a single issue of "All-Negro Comics" in 1947. He was then virtually blacklisted.


The Toonseum, which celebrates comic art, is helping curate the exhibit. Toonseum Director Joe Wos says it appears the big comic publishers were threatened by the subject matter and by an independent competitor.


Associated Press
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