Last updated: April 17. 2013 9:34PM - 1026 Views
Associated Press



Carlos Arredondo speaks to a reporter in his home in the Roslindale neighborhood of Boston, Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Arredondo, a peace activist whose son was killed during the Iraq war, was handing out flags nearby at the time of the explosions and assisted victims after a  pair of bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
Carlos Arredondo speaks to a reporter in his home in the Roslindale neighborhood of Boston, Wednesday, April 17, 2013. Arredondo, a peace activist whose son was killed during the Iraq war, was handing out flags nearby at the time of the explosions and assisted victims after a pair of bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. (AP Photo/Josh Reynolds)
Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

(AP) Virtually overnight, a peace activist with a colorful past has turned into a living reminder of both the horror and bravery witnessed in the double bombing at the Boston Marathon.


Fifty-two-year-old Carlos Arredondo was watching from the finish line when the bombs went off Monday. He was caught in a dramatic Associated Press photo pushing a wheelchair with a victim who lost most of his lower legs.


Visitors to his home Wednesday included reporters and two FBI agents. Arredondo says the agents asked routine questions they hoped would help them solve the crime.


Arredondo's enlisted son was killed in 2004 by a sniper in Iraq. The grief-stricken father smashed the windows of the family van, climbed inside and set it on fire. He says the fire was an accident.


In 2011, his younger son committed suicide.


Associated Press
Comments
comments powered by Disqus


Featured Businesses


Poll



Mortgage Minute