Last updated: October 06. 2013 10:25PM - 343 Views

A man stands next to his injured student son at a hospital in Dahuk, Iraq, on Sunday. A suicide bomber detonated the explosives-laden car he was driving near an elementary school in the north of the country, officials said.
A man stands next to his injured student son at a hospital in Dahuk, Iraq, on Sunday. A suicide bomber detonated the explosives-laden car he was driving near an elementary school in the north of the country, officials said.
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BAGHDAD


Suicide blasts kill


33, many children


Deadly attacks in Iraq killed at least 33 people on Sunday, including a dozen children slain when a suicide bomber detonated the explosives-laden car he was driving near their elementary school in the north of the country, officials said.


The attacks are the latest in a relentless wave of killing that has made for Iraq’s deadliest outburst of violence since 2008.


Sunday’s blasts began around 9:30 a.m. in the Shiite Turkomen village of Qabak, just outside the town of Tal Afar. The area around the stricken village has long been a hotbed for hard-to-rout Sunni insurgents and a corridor for extremist fighters arriving from nearby Syria.


BEIRUT


Experts begin work


on Syrian arsenal


International disarmament experts on Sunday began dismantling and destroying Syria’s chemical weapons arsenal and the equipment used to produce it, taking the first concrete step in their colossal task of eliminating the country’s chemical stockpile by mid-2014, an official said.


The inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons have about nine months to purge President Bashar Assad’s regime of its chemical program.


Sunday marked the fifth day that an advance team of around 20 inspectors have been in the country and the first day that involved actually disabling and destroying weapons and machinery, an official on the joint OPCW-U.N. mission said.


BUFFALO, N.Y.


Family’s business


was crack cocaine


For a dozen years, Theresa Anderson was the queen of Deshler Street. The unassuming woman owned five small wooden houses along the poor side street, filling them with her children, grandchildren and other relatives who kept their lots tidy, watched out for trouble and pitched in with the family business.


That the family business was selling crack cocaine at all hours of the day and night didn’t seem to matter to some of the neighbors, who say their little street on Buffalo’s impoverished east side has actually gotten less secure since SWAT teams stormed in and shut down Anderson’s drug operation last year.


The 58-year-old Anderson, who is set to be sentenced this week to up to 17 ½ years for conspiracy, was notable for her ordinary appearance. Neighbors say that’s part of why she and her family are remembered more for being valued neighbors than being drug peddlers.


LAFITTE, La.


Storm Karen


dissipates in Gulf


After days of lumbering toward the Gulf Coast, the storm system Karen dissipated Sunday as storm preparations in the region were called off or scaled back.


As tides began to recede along coastal Louisiana, crews worked to pick up sandbags and some fishermen took to the water. In Lafitte, the tide had water levels along Bayou Barataria lapping at the edges of piers and sections of the main roadway into the small fishing village prone to flooding.


The community has been swamped with flooding by several storms since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Many are just recovering from Hurricane Isaac last summer. Some are in the process of having their homes raised, and Mayor Timothy Kerner said levees are being planned for the area.


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