Last updated: May 24. 2013 12:01AM - 931 Views

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WASHINGTON — Investors have grown nervous that the Federal Reserve will scale back its efforts to boost the U.S. economy sooner than many expected.


Yet almost lost in the anxiety that gripped the stock market this week is that whenever the Fed slows its drive to keep interest rates low, it will be cause for celebration: It would mean policymakers think the economy is strong enough to accelerate with less help from the Fed.


“We should be wishing for higher interest rates,” says Kevin Logan, HSBC’s chief U.S. economist. “It would be a sign of a more healthy economy.”


Over the past five years, the Fed has acted aggressively to try to boost the economy. Among other steps, it cut short-term interest rates to record lows and said it planned to keep them there at least until unemployment falls to 6.5 percent (from 7.5 percent in April).


And in September it began a third round of bond purchases — $85 billion a month. The goal has been to drive down long-term loan rates and encourage more borrowing, spending and hiring.


The lower rates have fueled a surge in stock prices: The Standard & Poor’s 500 stock index has jumped about 17 percent this year and set a record high. Even so, investors have grown jittery about the Fed’s likely timetable for starting to curtail its bond purchases.


Speculation intensified Wednesday after the Fed released a summary of the April 30-May 1 meeting of its policy committee. The minutes said “a number of participants” were open to reducing the Fed’s bond purchases as soon as its next meeting June 18-19 — if the economy is showing strong and sustained growth.


The news caused stocks to gyrate Wednesday, and the Dow Jones industrial average finished down 80 points. On Thursday, investors appeared calmer, but stocks still closed down slightly.


The Fed faces a perilous decision: If it pulls back its stimulus too soon, the U.S. economic recovery could sputter. If it waits too long, super-low rates could ignite inflation. Or they could swell speculative asset bubbles as investors pursue riskier investments with potentially richer returns than low-yielding bonds.


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