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Mailbag: Letters From Readers


April 05. 2013 7:30AM
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History seems to be repeating itself


See if any of this sounds familiar:


1. The top 1 percent of property owners owned 44 percent of the wealth.


2. It is no longer a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, but a government of Wall Street, by Wall Street and for Wall Street. There are thirty men in the United States whose aggregate wealth is over one and one-half billion dollars. There are half a million looking for work.


3. The poor found themselves paying almost entirely for the staggering costs of the war.


4. All over the country, people organized spontaneously to stop evictions, in New York, in Chicago, in other cities-when word spread that someone was being evicted, a crowd would gather; the police would remove the furniture from the house, put it out in the street, and the crowd would bring the furniture back.


Number 1: was written by a historian who studied Boston tax lists in 1687 and 1771 found that by 1770, the top 1 percent of property owners owned 44 percent of the wealth.


Number 2: The great Populist orator from Topeka, Kansas, Mary Ellen Lease, told an enthusiastic crowd in 1890.Wall Street owns the country. It is no longer a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, but a government of Wall Street, by Wall Street and for Wall Street…. Our laws are the output of a system which clothes rascals in robes and honesty in rags. There are thirty men in the United States whose aggregate wealth is over one and one-half billion dollars. There are half a million looking for work.


Number 3: The Spanish American war in 1898 brought more employment and higher wages, but also higher prices. Philip Foner says: “Not only was there a startling increase in the cost of living, but, in the absence of an income tax, the poor found themselves paying almost entirely for the staggering costs of the war through increased levies on sugar, molasses, tobacco, and other taxes.


Number 4: In the 1930’s All over the country, people organized spontaneously to stop evictions, in New York, in Chicago, in other cities-when word spread that someone was being evicted, a crowd would gather; the police would remove the furniture from the house, put it out in the street, and the crowd would bring the furniture back.


I guess George Santayana was right when he said: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”


William J. Herbert

Wilkes-Barre

Volunteering today to cure Alzheimer’s


April marks the National Volunteers’ Month, which specifically recognizes the impact volunteers make in their efforts to help others.


The Alzheimer’s Association Greater Pennsylvania chapter’s appreciation is not merely limited to this specific month, as we strive to honor these volunteers all year long. Volunteers play a critical and irreplaceable role in our Chapter.


With volunteers’ help in 2012, the Association was able to serve over 40,000 individuals through direct programs and services and presented 636 programs to 14,701 individuals. With their advocacy efforts, they assisted in making the National Alzheimer’s Plan and the Pennsylvania State Alzheimer’s Plan a reality, as well as help fund over $12 million in dementia-focused research projects.


The significance of volunteering extends beyond the numbers. The imprint volunteers have left on individuals, families and communities cannot be measured. They have instilled strength, provided comfort and inspired change. With 24 Chapter staff to serve 59 of the 67 counties across Pennsylvania and with approximately 400,000 Pennsylvanians living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia, the reliance of the Alzheimer’s Association on volunteers is essential in carrying out its mission.


My staff and I are so grateful for all of the volunteers’ tremendous efforts on behalf of this daunting disease.


Without them, our work would be significantly more difficult.


Volunteering with the Alzheimer’s Association allows individuals to be a part of something much bigger, and the benefits of doing so are significant.


As such, we are always looking for people to join our already amazing team in a variety of roles, including Walk to End Alzheimer’s committee volunteers, marketing and public relations volunteers and support group facilitators.


To find out more, visit our website at alz.org/pa or call our Helpline at 1-800-272-3900.


Gail Roddie-Hamlin, MPH, CHES

President & CEO

Alzheimer’s Association Greater Pennsylvania Chapter

Reader says pope brightens future


Congratulations to Pope Francis I, Vicar of Christ. It is a bright future for the Catholic church. It rules. God grant him many years!


Alex S. Partika

Wilkes-Barre




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