Thursday, July 10, 2014





PEEKING INTO THE PAST


October 12. 2013 5:35PM
By JUDY MINSAVAGE jminsavage@psdispatch.com



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Question:


In 1960, which model compact car was advertised at a mere $1,845? Hint: It was an American Motors product.


1950 – 63 YEARS AGO


Plans for the placement of two Exeter historical markers were formulated and site work was scheduled to begin in November. The first marker placed “near the building of Joseph Esposito at the intersection of Wyoming Avenue and Valley Street” in Exeter denotes the line of the Battle of Wyoming. The marker can be seen online at www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=56393. The second marker was set on a lot donated by H.B. Schooley and marks the location of Fort Wintermoot or Wintermute, as it is occasionally spelled. It can be viewed online as well at www.pagenweb.org/~luzerne/patk/winter.htm. According to the website www.americanforts.com, Fort Wintermoot was a stockaded house built by Tory settlers from New York. Even though the occupants sided with the British forcesthe fort was burned by the British in July 1778.” The American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars in Exeter arranged for the markers to be erected. To read more about the Battle of Wyoming, read The Battle of Wyoming: For Liberty and Life (The Whole Story of the 1778 Battle and Massacre in Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania) by Mark G. Dziak.


Jean Salio, Maureen Kelly and Charlotte Karichner, of Hughestown, were not only close friends but military reservists as well. All three enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserves and were expecting orders to report to Parris Island, SC. In 1950, the Women Marine Corps Reserves were mobilized for the Korean War and 2,787 women were called to active duty. At the peak of the Vietnam War, about 2,700 women had served both stateside and overseas.


1960 – 43 YEARS AGO


The Duryea Civil Defense Auxiliary Police unit celebrated its third year. In 1960, the unit received new uniforms for their members after experiencing growth in each of those years. Members were Leroy Kellaway, Edward Neureuter, Henry Evans, Leonard Lankowski, Tom Williams, Henry Levandowski, John Zajulka, John Novakowski, Henry Levandoski, John Salek, Paul Komensky, Joseph Rava, Leonard Nawrocki, Al Thorne, Joe Sherinsky, Chester Dempski, Stanley Niewadomski, Joseph Belaski, Leonard Wendoloski, Mike Girman, John Roberts, Joseph Rava Jr., Robert Hynoski, Peter Pochalonis, Joe Gross and B.J. Gross.


It was a lucky Columbus Day for Edward Ziobro, of West Pittston. He was the winner of the annual Knights of Columbus drawing which featured a new four-door Pontiac Catalina sedan. Vincent Yermal, contest chairman, handed over the keys to the shiny finned beauty that touted amenities such as full carpeting, glove box and trunk lights, dual front ashtrays, cigar lighter, glove compartment snack bar (two cup indents on the glove box door that could be opened for use at drive-in restaurants), heater/defroster and a choice of cloth and vinyl upholstery.


1970 – 33 YEARS AGO


There was a controversy brewing regarding the Wilson School in Duryea. The building, constructed “about 1915” was in the process of being razed and rumor had it that 13 homes were to be built on the site. Some residents felt Jones Park, adjacent to the school property, was being included in the plan, as the school property was not large enough to construct that many homes. Residents believed the park belonged to the community and was never to be sold. After the school closed, residents heard a buyer of the school canceled his purchase because he learned the park was not part of the grounds. To the dismay of the residents, it was believed new owners of the school property may have purchased the park from Jones’ family members.


Answer:


Luchetti Sales and Service advertised the Rambler American Deluxe 2-door sedan for $1,845 in 1960. Manufactured by the American Motors Corporation (AMC) between 1958 and 1969, the popular compact was most often the lowest-priced car built in the U.S. Some other surprising comparisons to today’s prices are : In 1960, a new house cost $12,700 and by 1969 was $15,500, the average income per year was $5,315 and by 1969 was $8,540 and a gallon of gas was 25 cents and by 1969, 35 cents.


“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” Robert F. Kennedy




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