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No one really can tell how much technological progress North has made.

Last updated: April 06. 2013 7:10PM - 979 Views

A South Korean Army soldier walks on Unification Bridge in Paju, South Korea, near the border village of Panmunjom, Saturday, April 6, 2013. More South Koreans on Saturday began to leave North Korea and the factory park where they work, four days after Pyongyang closed the border to people and goods. (AP Photo/AhnnYoung-joon)
A South Korean Army soldier walks on Unification Bridge in Paju, South Korea, near the border village of Panmunjom, Saturday, April 6, 2013. More South Koreans on Saturday began to leave North Korea and the factory park where they work, four days after Pyongyang closed the border to people and goods. (AP Photo/AhnnYoung-joon)
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WASHINGTON — North Korea is widely recognized as being years away from perfecting the technology to back up its bold threats of a pre-emptive strike on America. But some nuclear experts say it might have the know-how to fire a nuclear-tipped missile at South Korea and Japan, which host U.S. military bases.


No one can tell with any certainty how much technological progress North Korea has made, aside from perhaps a few people close to its secretive leadership.


If true, it is unlikely the North would launch such an attack because the retaliation would be devastating.


The North’s third nuclear test on Feb. 12, which prompted the toughest U.N. Security Council penalties yet, is presumed to have advanced its ability to miniaturize a nuclear device.


Experts say it’s easier to design a nuclear warhead that works on a shorter-range missile than one for an intercontinental missile that could target the U.S.


The assessment of David Albright at the Institute for Science and International Security think-tank is that North Korea has the capability to mount a warhead on its Nodong missile, which has a range of 800 miles and could hit in South Korea and most of Japan.


He said in his analysis, published after the latest nuclear test, that it is an uncertain estimate, and the warhead’s reliability remains unclear.


Albright contends that the experience of Pakistan could serve as precedent.


Pakistan bought the Nodong from North Korea after its first flight test in 1993, then adapted and produced it for its own use. Pakistan, which conducted its first nuclear test in 1998, is said to have taken less than 10 years to miniaturize a warhead before that test, Albright said.


North Korea also obtained technology from the trafficking network of A.Q. Khan, a disgraced pioneer of Pakistan’s nuclear program, acquiring centrifuges for enriching uranium. According to the Congressional Research Service, Khan may also have supplied a Chinese-origin nuclear weapon design he provided to Libya and Iran, which could have helped the North in developing a warhead for a ballistic missile.


But Siegfried Hecker at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation, who has visited North Korea seven times and been granted unusual access to its nuclear facilities, is skeptical the North has advanced that far in miniaturization of a nuclear device.


“Nobody outside of a small elite in North Korea knows — and even they don’t know for sure,” he said in an emailed response to questions from The Associated Press. “I agree that we cannot rule it out for one of their shorter-range missiles, but we simply don’t know.”


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