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Would-be waste materials from I-81 used to resurface local four-digit State Routes

Last updated: July 30. 2013 3:47PM - 748 Views
By - ebaumeister@civitasmedia.com - (570) 704-3943



Elizabeth Baumeister/Abington JournalPennDOT's Asphalt Recycling Program takes what otherwise may be waste materials from Interstate 81 and puts them to use on smaller and rural state roads. When the rocks arrive from construction sites to the department's processing site on Hillside Drive in Clarks Summit, they are first put through a grinder, then transferred to a pugmill (shown) which mixes them with oil, water and 2B stone. From there, the finished product is loaded into dump trucks and taken to the local construction sites, dumped into the paver and laid on the road.
Elizabeth Baumeister/Abington JournalPennDOT's Asphalt Recycling Program takes what otherwise may be waste materials from Interstate 81 and puts them to use on smaller and rural state roads. When the rocks arrive from construction sites to the department's processing site on Hillside Drive in Clarks Summit, they are first put through a grinder, then transferred to a pugmill (shown) which mixes them with oil, water and 2B stone. From there, the finished product is loaded into dump trucks and taken to the local construction sites, dumped into the paver and laid on the road.
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In other news: PennDOT proposes $50 million Lackawanna Trail Project

The Department of Transportation Dist 4-0 proposed improvement of the SR 0006 corridor, a four-lane divided urban arterial highway constructed in the early 1950s. The project area includes SR 0006 and SR 0011 from Factoryville, Wyoming County to Clarks Summit, Lackawanna County. The total project length is 8.6 miles.

The estimated cost is $54,387,984, which includes estimate, inspection and Year of Expenditure.

The existing reinforced concrete road will be rubblized and receive a bituminous overlay. Signing and pavement markings will be renewed. Shoulders will be rebuilt and widened as feasible within the existing footprint. Guiderail will be replaced. Traffic signals will be added, upgraded and retimed. Existing inlets, manholes, end walls and culverts will be cleaned or replaced as necessary. The project includes the repair or replacement of seven highway structures including bridges, culverts and one steel crib retaining wall.

The proposed let date is May 22, 2014.

Roads on the Recycled Asphalt Program schedule for this year include:

  • SR 4005 (Seaman’s Road), 3.01 miles
  • SR 4004 (Clarkson Road), 2.07 miles
  • SR 3009 (Laurel Hill Road), 3.85 miles

Other upcoming local PennDOT road work:

  • From Sept. 2013 to July 2014, the department plans to complete significant repairs to SR 6 on the pipe that runs under the road from the Glenburn Pond. The estimated cost is $1.2 million.
  • Roads to be paved this season include: Venard Road, Fairview Road and SR 407 (Abington Road). Venard and Fairview roads are part of a bigger paving package which will cost $2.3 million.

The Asphalt Recycling Program process:

  • The Recycled Asphalt Program is implemented on four-digit State Routes with ADTs (average daily traffic) of 3,000 or less and limited truck traffic.
  • Candidate roads are prepared in advance for overlay. Edges must be repaired and in relatively good condition.
  • The material is placed in a 2.5 inch lifts over the existing surface, similar to traditional plant mix paving.
  • Fog seal is applied to the road following overlay to prevent raveling.
  • Once the paving is completed and cured it receives oil and chip surface treatment in the same season.



Residents of Laurel Hill Road, Newton Twp., as well as several roads in Dalton, can now say they live on “old Interstate 81.”


Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s (PennDOT) Asphalt Recycling Program takes what may otherwise be waste materials from I-81 and puts them to use on four-digit State Routes with ATDs (average daily traffic) of 3,000 or less and limited truck traffic. The program, which began last year in Dalton with Lower Mill City Road, Bank Street, Wilbur Hill Road and Seminary Road, is scheduled to continue this year with Seaman’s Road in Factoryville and Clarkson Road in Fleetville, in addition to completion of the project on Laurel Hill Road, which connects with Forrest Acres Drive.


The recycled asphalt, according to Tom Boland, Highway Foreman 2 working on the Laurel Hill Road project, costs the department only $13 to $16 a ton, as opposed to the cost of buying new materials at a maximum of about $60 a ton.


The chunks of asphalt are first transported from construction sites on the highway to the department’s stock pile on Hillside Drive in Clarks Summit (across from the Clarks Summit State Hospital). There, they are put through a grinder, then transferred to a pugmill, which mixes them with oil, water and 2B stone. Next, the finished product is loaded into dump trucks and taken to the local construction sites, dumped into pavers and laid on the road.


Bill Angel stood with his dog and watched the last two steps of this process unfold July 25 in front of his driveway on Laurel Hill Road.


“The road was real patchy before. This is beautiful,” he said, pointing to the area in front of his driveway.


Angel said he’s been waiting for the road to be repaired since he moved to the property in 2006. He used to watch drivers cautiously ease their way down the hill and around the curve because of the poor condition of the road, but he now suspects he may need to request a “hidden driveway” sign to slow them down.


James May, PennDOT spokesperson, said the program benefits not only the department, but the taxpayers and the environment, as it recycles materials which previously ended up in landfills, costing a fraction of the amount it would if the materials were purchased elsewhere.


“By recycling asphalt from Interstate 81 and putting it down on the roads here in the Abingtons,” he said, “we are able to improve roads that we otherwise couldn’t have improved due to funding. The Recycled Asphalt Program is not only good for the environment, but it is a fiscally wise thing for us to be doing.”


In addition, the close proximity of the stockpile to the roads where the asphalt is laid decreases the hauling expenses of the material.


On a full production day, according to Thomas Harris, operator B, 1,000 tons of asphalt can be processed at the stock pile and laid on the road. A tandem axle truck holds at about 16 tons of asphalt. The trucks run in a constant cycle transporting the materials to the road and returning to the stock pile for more as fast as it is produced by the machines.


 
 
 
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