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America casts its ballots on democracy‚??s day


February 19. 2013 3:55PM
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APEX, N.C.: Once laid-off, a voter says Obama deserves a chance to turn things around


A few miles outside of Raleigh, N.C., voters streamed into the Wake County Firearms Education & Training Center to cast ballots. They lined up along a hallway dominated by posters offering National Rifle Association classes and ladies handgun leagues. As Jerome Gantt signed in at the registration table, a target stared at him from the wall beyond.


The 34-year-old black independent voted for Republican John McCain four years ago, but not because he did not like Barack Obama.


I honestly didn't want a black man to be the first president coming into that bad a situation, said Gantt, who works for a pharmaceuticals company.


Gantt is far from happy with how the last four years have turned out. He and his wife, Paquita, were laid off within months of each other. Both are now back at work, and he feels that many who remain unemployed either didn't want to take a step down or move out of their comfort zone.


And, he added: I don't think four years is enough time really to turn anything around.


Pat Crosswhite couldn't disagree more. The 55-year-old Holly Springs woman thinks Obama, if re-elected, should be impeached over his handling of the consulate attack in Libya. I think what he started is terrible, said Crosswhite, who does voice-overs for television commercials. I don't want him to finish it.


Four years ago, Gantt resisted the tug of history. This time, he favored giving Obama the chance to live up to his promises.


I don't feel elation, he said. Even if Obama wins, I won't go out celebrating tonight and say, ‘Yes. We won.' Because we won't win until four years from now, when we can see what the results are of his actions.


The big dipper hangs over Liberty Street as Frank Puzzo arrives to begin his Election Day duties. Just a week ago, rescuers were piloting boats through three feet of water that coursed past Memorial School and throughout this storm-scarred town. Now, it's 28 degrees; the first voters won't arrive for nearly an hour.


But Puzzo — whose apartment still has no heat or hot water, whose car was claimed by storm surge — is the first to arrive to prepare and open the polls.


This is super important for the future of the country, says Puzzo, an accountant who has been out of work since July.


The people of Little Ferry could be pardoned if they focused purely on their beleaguered present. Some arrived shivering and clearly exhausted, their long-held certainties about shelter and safety deeply shaken. But the future matters to the people lined up at the voting machines in the hallway outside Ms. Kukula's third-grade class.


Agim Coma, a 25-year-old construction worker, is the first voter to arrive, 13 minutes before polls open. The storm claimed his apartment and car.


It's important because it's our day, he said, as Election Day in America got under way here and everywhere. No matter what happens — hurricanes, tornados — it's our day to vote.


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