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Judge approves oil spill plea deal


February 20. 2013 4:11AM
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NEW ORLEANS — A federal judge on Tuesday approved an agreement for BP PLC to plead guilty to manslaughter and other charges and pay a record $4 billion in criminal penalties for the company's role in the 2010 rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.


U.S. District Judge Sarah Vance said the plea deal was just punishment considering the alternatives to the settlement, including the risk that a trial could result in a lower fine for BP.


Before she ruled, Vance heard emotional testimony from relatives of 11 workers who died when BP's blown-out Macondo well triggered an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and started the spill.


I've heard and I truly understand your feelings and the losses you suffered, she said.


Billy Anderson, whose 35-year-old son, Jason, of Midfield, Texas, died in the blast, recalled the trauma of watching the disaster play out on television.


These men suffered a horrendous death, he said. They were basically cremated alive and not at their choice.


BP agreed in November to plead guilty to charges involving the workers' deaths and for lying to Congress about the size of the spill from its broken well, which spewed more than 200 million gallons of oil. Much of it ended up in the Gulf and soiled the shorelines of several states. The company could have withdrawn from the agreement if Vance had rejected it.


BP America vice president Luke Keller apologized to the relatives of the workers who died and for the spill's environmental damage to the Gulf Coast.


BP knows there is nothing we can say to diminish their loss, he said. The lives lost and those forever changed will stay with us. We are truly sorry.


Courtney Kemp-Robertson, whose 27-year-old husband, Roy Wyatt Kemp, of Jonesville, La., died on the rig, said workers had referred to it as the well from hell before the explosion.


By cutting corners, they gambled with the lives of 126 crew members to save a few dollars, she told the judge before turning to address Keller. They gambled and you lost.


Vance told victims' relatives who were in court that she read their truly gut-wrenching written statements and factored their words into her decision. She also said she believes BP executives should have personally apologized to family members long before Monday's hearing.




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