Today in history

The Associated Press
On July 30, 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, having just delivered components of the atomic bomb to Tinian in the Mariana Islands, was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine; only 317 out of nearly 1,200 men survived. - AP photo
On this date in 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his remains have never been found. - AP photo
On this date in 2002, WNBA player Lisa Leslie of the Los Angeles Sparks became the first woman to dunk in a professional game, jamming on a breakaway in the first half of the Sparks’ 82-73 loss to the Miami Sol. - AP photo
On July 30, 2001, Robert Mueller (MUHL’-ur), President George W. Bush’s choice to head the FBI, promised the Senate Judiciary Committee that if confirmed, he would move forcefully to fix problems at the agency. (Mueller became FBI director on Sept. 4, 2001, a week before the 9/11 attacks.) - - AP photo

Today is Monday, July 30, the 211th day of 2018. There are 154 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 30, 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, having just delivered components of the atomic bomb to Tinian in the Mariana Islands, was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine; only 317 out of nearly 1,200 men survived.

On this date:

In 1619, the first representative assembly in America convened in Jamestown in the Virginia Colony.

In 1864, during the Civil War, Union forces tried to take Petersburg, Virginia, by exploding a gunpowder-laden mine shaft beneath Confederate defense lines; the attack failed.

In 1916, German saboteurs blew up a munitions plant on Black Tom, an island near Jersey City, New Jersey, killing about a dozen people.

In 1932, the Summer Olympic Games opened in Los Angeles.

In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed a bill creating a women’s auxiliary agency in the Navy known as “Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service” — WAVES for short.

In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a measure making “In God We Trust” the national motto, replacing “E Pluribus Unum” (Out of many, one).

In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed a measure creating Medicare, which began operating the following year.

In 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his remains have never been found.

In 1980, Israel’s Knesset passed a law reaffirming all of Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state.

In 2001, Robert Mueller (MUHL’-ur), President George W. Bush’s choice to head the FBI, promised the Senate Judiciary Committee that if confirmed, he would move forcefully to fix problems at the agency. (Mueller became FBI director on Sept. 4, 2001, a week before the 9/11 attacks.)

In 2002, WNBA player Lisa Leslie of the Los Angeles Sparks became the first woman to dunk in a professional game, jamming on a breakaway in the first half of the Sparks’ 82-73 loss to the Miami Sol.

In 2003, President George W. Bush took personal responsibility for the first time for using discredited intelligence in his State of the Union address, but predicted he would be vindicated for going to war against Iraq.

Ten years ago: Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic (RA’-doh-van KA’-ra-jich) was extradited to The Hague to face genocide charges after nearly 13 years on the run. President George W. Bush quietly signed a housing bill he’d once threatened to veto; it was intended to rescue some cash-strapped homeowners in fear of foreclosure. Amid corruption allegations and his own plummeting popularity, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert (EH’-hood OHL’-murt) announced he would resign.

Five years ago: U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning was acquitted of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but was convicted of espionage, theft and other charges at Fort Meade, Maryland, more than three years after he’d spilled secrets to WikiLeaks. (The former intelligence analyst, now known as Chelsea Manning, was later sentenced to up to 35 years in prison. The sentence was commuted by President Barack Obama in his final days in office.) Former Sen. Harry F. Byrd Jr., 98, died in Winchester, Virginia.

One year ago: Three days after the U.S. Congress approved sanctions against Russia in response to its meddling in the 2016 U.S. election and its military aggression in Ukraine and Syria, Russian President Vladimir Putin said the United States would have to cut the number of embassy and consulate staff in Russia by 755.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Edd (correct) “Kookie” Byrnes is 85. Former Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is 84. Blues musician Buddy Guy is 82. Movie director Peter Bogdanovich is 79. Feminist activist Eleanor Smeal is 79. Former U.S. Rep. Patricia Schroeder is 78. Singer Paul Anka is 77. Jazz musician David Sanborn is 73. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is 71. Actor William Atherton is 71. Actor Jean Reno (zhahn rih-NOH’) is 70. Blues singer-musician Otis Taylor is 70. Actor Frank Stallone is 68. Actor Ken Olin is 64. Actress Delta Burke is 62. Law professor Anita Hill is 62. Singer-songwriter Kate Bush is 60. Country singer Neal McCoy is 60. Actor Richard Burgi is 60. Movie director Richard Linklater is 58. Actor Laurence Fishburne is 57. Actress Lisa Kudrow is 55. Bluegrass musician Danny Roberts (The Grascals) is 55. Country musician Dwayne O’Brien is 55. Actress Vivica A. Fox is 54. Actor Terry Crews is 50. Actor Simon Baker is 49. Actor Donnie Keshawarz is 49. Movie director Christopher Nolan is 48. Actor Tom Green is 47. Rock musician Brad Hargreaves (Third Eye Blind) is 47. Actress Christine Taylor is 47. Actor-comedian Dean Edwards is 45. Actress Hilary Swank is 44. Olympic gold medal beach volleyball player Misty May-Treanor is 41. Actress Jaime Pressly is 41. Alt-country singer-musician Seth Avett (AY’-veht) is 38. Actress April Bowlby is 38. Soccer player Hope Solo is 37. Actress Yvonne Strahovski is 36. Actor Martin Starr is 36. Actress Gina Rodriguez is 34. Actor Nico Tortorella is 30. Actress Joey King is 19.

Thought for Today: “Individualism is rather like innocence; there must be something unconscious about it.” — Louis Kronenberger, American drama critic (1904-1980).

On July 30, 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, having just delivered components of the atomic bomb to Tinian in the Mariana Islands, was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine; only 317 out of nearly 1,200 men survived.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_AP_450730059.jpgOn July 30, 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis, having just delivered components of the atomic bomb to Tinian in the Mariana Islands, was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine; only 317 out of nearly 1,200 men survived. AP photo

On this date in 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his remains have never been found.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_AP_341893822525.jpgOn this date in 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his remains have never been found. AP photo

On this date in 2002, WNBA player Lisa Leslie of the Los Angeles Sparks became the first woman to dunk in a professional game, jamming on a breakaway in the first half of the Sparks’ 82-73 loss to the Miami Sol.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_AP_18178027456113.jpgOn this date in 2002, WNBA player Lisa Leslie of the Los Angeles Sparks became the first woman to dunk in a professional game, jamming on a breakaway in the first half of the Sparks’ 82-73 loss to the Miami Sol. AP photo

On July 30, 2001, Robert Mueller (MUHL’-ur), President George W. Bush’s choice to head the FBI, promised the Senate Judiciary Committee that if confirmed, he would move forcefully to fix problems at the agency. (Mueller became FBI director on Sept. 4, 2001, a week before the 9/11 attacks.)
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_AP_060817018413.jpgOn July 30, 2001, Robert Mueller (MUHL’-ur), President George W. Bush’s choice to head the FBI, promised the Senate Judiciary Committee that if confirmed, he would move forcefully to fix problems at the agency. (Mueller became FBI director on Sept. 4, 2001, a week before the 9/11 attacks.) AP photo

The Associated Press