Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center building $18M ‘greener’ utility plant

By Roger DuPuis - [email protected]
Expected to be completed in fall 2018, this 13,500-square-foot central utility plant will allow Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center to operate independent of the public power grid should a natural disaster strike, and also will reduce energy costs by $1.5 million per year. - Submitted photo

PLAINS TWP. — Construction is underway at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center on an $18 million central utility plant that will provide clean energy for the campus for decades to come, hospital officials say.

Expected to be completed in fall 2018, the 13,500-square-foot facility’s design will allow GWV to operate independent of the public power grid should a natural disaster strike.

Located several hundred feet northeast of the Robert M. Pearsall Heart Hospital, the plant will house a variety of energy-efficient equipment including cogeneration, electric chillers, boilers, chilled water storage, an emergency generator, underground diesel fuel oil storage tanks and a steam turbine chiller.

Geisinger officials expect to reduce their energy consumption by 40 percent and achieve a savings of nearly $1.5 million per year with this investment.

It fits into Geisinger’s broader, longstanding effort to reduce the Danville-based health system’s carbon footprint. That initiative has shaved $15 million off annual costs and translates into environmental benefits that represent the equivalent of six fewer deaths, four fewer cases of chronic bronchitis, 129 fewer asthma attacks and 6,160 fewer respiratory symptoms.

“As a healthcare provider, it is crucial that we are leaders in operating ‘green’ facilities to minimize our impact on the environment as well as promote healthy communities for our friends, families and neighbors to live,” said Al Neuner, vice president of Geisinger’s facilities operations.

Expected to be completed in fall 2018, this 13,500-square-foot central utility plant will allow Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center to operate independent of the public power grid should a natural disaster strike, and also will reduce energy costs by $1.5 million per year.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/web1_CUP-Rendering-Perspective-2.jpgExpected to be completed in fall 2018, this 13,500-square-foot central utility plant will allow Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center to operate independent of the public power grid should a natural disaster strike, and also will reduce energy costs by $1.5 million per year. Submitted photo

By Roger DuPuis

[email protected]