Ceremony marks 59th anniversary of Knox Mine Disaster

By Marcella Kester - For Times Leader
Bob Wolensky, author of two books on the Knox Mine Disaster, points to the list of those who died in the disaster. - Tony Callaio | For Times Leader
James Cortegerone, right, blesses the monunment with Sam DeAlba looking on. - Tony Callaio | For Times Leader
Sam DeAlba, right, along with John Baloga, grandson of one of the victims of the disaster, place a wreath on the Knox Mine Disaster monement. - Tony Callaio | For Times Leader
David Marx, left, and James Cortegerone recite a prayer Sunday to commorate the 59th anniversary of the Knox Mine Disaster with family and friends of the deceased behind. - - Tony Callaio | For Times Leader

JENKINS TWP. — Today marks the 59th anniversary of the day that the Susquehanna River broke through the ceiling of the Knox Mine, killing 12 men.

An additional 69 miners were able to escape the mine as the river’s icy water rushed in.

Dozens of area residents gathered Sunday in Port Griffith to remember those who were lost in the Knox Mine Disaster.

Gathered around a stone memorial that sits in front of Baloga Funeral Home, attendees stood in silence as they listened to King’s College history professor Bob Wolensky speak about the events that took place on Jan. 22, 1959.

The mining company, the Knox Coal Company, disregarded regulations that stated mines must keep 35 feet of rock between the mine’s ceiling and riverbeds. The Susquehanna breached a six-foot patch of rock and flooded the tunnels underneath.

The incident is largely credited with being the dagger through the heart of the local coal mining industry, while also shedding light on a corrupt mining company. The Knox Coal Company dug their tunnels off-course with blatant disregard to regulations, Wolensky said.

While the disaster brought these issues to the forefront, many of those indicted on charges only served about 2 years in prison on tax evasion, and the bodies of the men whose lives were lost were never able to be recovered.

“Unfortunately, the men at Knox are still there — and that’s their cemetery, ” he said. “Us doing this every year, we help the victims families cope with this and deal with this because they don’t know where their loved ones are.”

John Baloga has a personal tie to the ceremony and the disaster.

His grandfather, John, was one of the 12 miners who perished. After purchasing the former church where the memorial ceremony was held annually to run his funeral home, Baloga decided to continue the tradition. He remembers, as a child, his father attending the ceremonies.

Although he was too young to understand what had happened at the time, he went with his father anyway, later gaining that knowledge and understanding with age.

“We used to come to the mass in this building every year when they had the Knox Mine Memorial Mass,” he said of what is now his funeral home.

After the ceremony, more than 20 attendees made the trek down the street, walking half-a-mile through the snow to the site where the Susquehanna opened into the mine. Surrounding a marker adorned with three veteran flags, they listened as Wolensky and Bill Best, president of the Huber Breaker Preservation Society and longtime assistant to the Knox Commemorative Ceremony, continued to speak about the heroic events that took place in that very spot 59 years ago.

Numerous relatives of Knox miners were present in the crowd, many choosing to share their accounts of the day.

In the crowd, Pittston resident Tom Stegura recalled what he saw the day of the disaster and the efforts many made trying to close the hole, including dropping railroad cars and more down to no avail. His uncle, Tony Remus, was one of the miners who was able to escape.

“I was only 7 or 8 years old when this all happened. I remember being down here that day,” he said. “The whole town was down here. I saw the water going down the hole. I saw the ice going down the hole. I’ll never forget that.”

Tony Remus was able to escape with the help of Myron Thomas. Thomas, along with Joe Stella, were largely responsible for the rescue of dozens of miners that day. An assistant foreman, Thomas was on his lunch break when the river broke through according his to granddaughter, Rebecca Thomas-Palmer, who attended the ceremony.

“I’m a fortunate one. I’m a lucky one. I knew him. I grew up with him,” she said. “Not everybody is. People call him a hero, but he was a humble man. He would never say he was a hero.”

Bob Wolensky, author of two books on the Knox Mine Disaster, points to the list of those who died in the disaster.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Knox-Mine-Disaster-2018-4.jpgBob Wolensky, author of two books on the Knox Mine Disaster, points to the list of those who died in the disaster. Tony Callaio | For Times Leader

James Cortegerone, right, blesses the monunment with Sam DeAlba looking on.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Knox-Mine-Disaster-2018-3.jpgJames Cortegerone, right, blesses the monunment with Sam DeAlba looking on. Tony Callaio | For Times Leader

Sam DeAlba, right, along with John Baloga, grandson of one of the victims of the disaster, place a wreath on the Knox Mine Disaster monement.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Knox-Mine-Disaster-2018-2.jpgSam DeAlba, right, along with John Baloga, grandson of one of the victims of the disaster, place a wreath on the Knox Mine Disaster monement. Tony Callaio | For Times Leader

David Marx, left, and James Cortegerone recite a prayer Sunday to commorate the 59th anniversary of the Knox Mine Disaster with family and friends of the deceased behind.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_Knox-Mine-Disaster-2018-1.jpgDavid Marx, left, and James Cortegerone recite a prayer Sunday to commorate the 59th anniversary of the Knox Mine Disaster with family and friends of the deceased behind. Tony Callaio | For Times Leader

By Marcella Kester

For Times Leader

Reach the Times Leader newsroom at 570-829-7242 or on Twitter @TLnews.

Reach the Times Leader newsroom at 570-829-7242 or on Twitter @TLnews.