Land trust, Game Commission to host local fisher program

Times Leader
The fisher will be the subject of an April 3 program by the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the North Branch Land Trust. The myths surrounding the predatory behavior of the fisher will be discussed, along with its place in the ecosystem of northeastern Pennsylvania. Submitted photo The fisher will be the subject of an April 3 program by the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the North Branch Land Trust. The myths surrounding the predatory behavior of the fisher will be discussed, along with its place in the ecosystem of northeastern Pennsylvania. - Submitted photo

North Branch Land Trust and Pennsylvania Game Commission will hold a program on fishers on Wednesday, April 3, at 6 p.m. at the Pennsylvania Game Commission Northeast Regional Headquarters in Dallas. The fisher, once extirpated from Pennsylvania’s forests, has returned to their native range. Information and Education Supervisor William Williams will describe the recovery of fisher populations and the ecology, behavior and management of this adaptable predator.

“Reports of fishers wreaking havoc on game populations are commonly bandied about by Pennsylvania sportsmen,” Williams said. “However, when this deep-forest denizen is examined without emotional bias, what emerges is a fascinating animal deserving of a little more understanding.”

There is no fee for this event. Registration is required by 5 p.m. Friday, March 29, and the participation limit is 40 attendees. Register by emailing [email protected], or calling the NBLT office at 570-310-1781.

The fisher will be the subject of an April 3 program by the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the North Branch Land Trust. The myths surrounding the predatory behavior of the fisher will be discussed, along with its place in the ecosystem of northeastern Pennsylvania.
https://www.timesleader.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/web1_Fisher.jpgThe fisher will be the subject of an April 3 program by the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the North Branch Land Trust. The myths surrounding the predatory behavior of the fisher will be discussed, along with its place in the ecosystem of northeastern Pennsylvania. Submitted photo

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